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dc.contributor.authorIsoglu-Alkac, Ummuhan
dc.contributor.authorKedzior, Karina
dc.contributor.authorKaramursel, Sacit
dc.contributor.authorErmutlu, Numan
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-13T12:10:23Z
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-13T16:05:37Z
dc.date.available2019-08-13T12:10:23Z
dc.date.available2019-08-13T16:05:37Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.issn0020-7454
dc.identifier.issn1563-5279
dc.identifier.urihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00207450600773509
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11446/3519
dc.descriptionWOS: 000244944000007en_US
dc.descriptionPubMed ID: 17380607en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the current study was to investigate the properties of a new modification of the classical auditory oddball paradigm ( auditory oddball paradigm combined with passive visual stimulation, AERPs+VEPs) and compare the scalp topography obtained with the new paradigm and the classical auditory oddball paradigm (AERPs) in healthy humans. The responses to bimodal stimulation, and to the classical oddball paradigm were similar to those reported in other studies in terms of location, amplitudes, and latencies of P1, N1, P2, N2, and P300. The new modification of the oddball paradigm produced P300 at fronto-central locations in contrast to centro-parietal locations during the classical oddball paradigm. The amplitudes and latencies of P300 were also significantly larger during the new than the classical paradigm. Furthermore, the amplitudes of N1 and P2, but not N2 were significantly higher and differed in location during the new paradigm in response to both target and standard stimuli. The latencies of all three waves were significantly longer and the latency of P2 differed in location between the new and the classical paradigms in response to only the standard stimuli. The results of this study suggest that the new modification of the classical oddball paradigm produces different neural responses to the classical oddball paradigm. Therefore, this modification can be used to investigate dysfunctions in sensory and cognitive processing in clinical samples.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherTAYLOR & FRANCIS LTDen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00207450600773509en_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/closedAccessen_US
dc.subjectauditory evoked potentialen_US
dc.subjectauditory oddball paradigmen_US
dc.subjectbimodal evoked potentialsen_US
dc.subjectevent-related potentialen_US
dc.subjectP300en_US
dc.subjectvisual evoked potentialen_US
dc.titleEvent-related potentials during auditory oddball, and combined auditory oddball-visual paradigmsen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.relation.journalINTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCEen_US
dc.departmentDBÜen_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.volume117en_US
dc.identifier.startpage487en_US
dc.identifier.endpage506en_US
dc.contributor.authorID0000-0002-7534-9392en_US
dc.contributor.authorID0000-0002-7534-9392en_US
dc.contributor.authorID0000-0001-9832-8263en_US
dc.relation.publicationcategoryMakale - Uluslararası Hakemli Dergi - Kurum Öğretim Elemanıen_US
dc.department-tempIstanbul Univ, Istanbul Fac Med, Dept Physiol, TR-34390 Istanbul, Turkey -- Univ Bremen, Ctr Cognit Sci, Bremen, Germany -- Univ Bremen, Inst Psychol & Cognit Res, Bremen, Germany -- Istanbul Bilim Univ, Dept Physiol, Istanbul, Turkeyen_US


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